Art Chicago Featured

Carlos Barberena Connects Colonialism & Corporatism Through His Linocut Art Prints

Written by:
Evan La Ruffa
Sep 28, 2015

The best thing art offers is freedom. Freedom to comment, discover, cajole, or embrace. If artists were merely looking for answers, they’d be mathematicians… and we’re so glad they’re not. As I walked through the Glenwood Arts Festival in Rogers Park a few weeks ago, Carlos’ work stood out.

The contrast and line work that are featured in Carlos Barberena’s linocut prints create a stark and magnetic feel. As soon as I saw that he had a political angle on the way Latin America experiences multinational corporations, well, I was in. The McDonald’s Mona Lisa couldn’t be a better representation of the ways in which the promise of profits leaves a lot to be desired in developing nations. How one gets out from under the boot or the board room is up for debate, but it’s clear to anyone living south of the Rio Grande that corporate involvement everywhere from Mexico to Argentina (and it’s not confined by this hemisphere, mind you) is a lot more dubious than the platitudes offered up by notions of free-trade & GDP.

Between the detail, the social commentary, and the beautiful aesthetics of relief, Carlos Barberena is a testament to the thriving creative scene the city of Chicago upholds. Our neighborhoods need to share more, but it’s great to see an artist like Carlos get attention for his skillful linocut conquests of corporate-speak.

Discover more art on IPaintMyMind

Calavera_Canera_after_Posada barberena Catrina_con_Sacuanjoches barberena De_que_mal_morira_after_Goya barberena El_Corazon_detail barberena El_Corazon_Man_white barberena la_llorona_1 barberena La_McMona_after_Da_Vinci barberena Les_Demoiselles_d'Avignon_after_Picasso barberena Madre_del_Desaparecido barberena novus barberena Ofrenda_after_Gauguin barberena pope.fb barberena Untitled_(monsanto) barberena Venus_2.0_after_Botticelli barberena who_lives_by_the_sword barberena

CarlosBarberena.com

Written by:
Evan La Ruffa
Sep 28, 2015

tags: Carlos Barberena, creative scene, exports, free-trade, GDP, glenwood arts festival, McDonald's Mona Lisa, mexico to argentina, rio grande, skillful linocut, social commentary, the city of Chicago