Art Featured

Exploring the Nostalgic Dissonance of Jane Hammond’s Mixed Media Characters

Written by:
Kimmy_gonzales
Jul 20, 2015

Jane Hammond has created a name for herself with all of the different art forms that she has managed to work with over this past decade. Abstract found art prints are just the tip of the iceberg. The variety of Hammond’s work seems endless – each image stands out just as much as the next.

Hammond has been showcasing her artwork since 1989 when she received her first one-person exhibition in New York at Exit Art. After that, Hammond has been showcased internationally and has grown fully as an artist. Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, she finally made her way to New York City in 1977 where she began collecting images from several manuals, children’s books, and charts focused on alchemy, animals, religion and phrenology. From the 276 images collected, she used them as an image bank for her various works of found art that she has now published.

There are times when Hammond shows us the same characters in different pieces. These characters are her name sake – each piece has a unique quality due to the tone and context of her final images.

Hammond’s influence on the art community has grown as she has done collaborations with poets Raphael Rubinstein and John Ashbery, whom she had made sixty-two paintings for based on titles suggested by Ashbery himself. The New York native has said to be influenced by the language of the human eye, the vernacular of human beings and what the mind itself perceives.

The art and influence that Hammond has spread has been phenomenal. Her motivation and creativity seeps through the pieces that she provides to the world. The simplicity of her work and the multiplicity of her characters lets us into her world and tells us a story through images.

Check out her full gallery here, and if you’re always on the look out for new art, the best way to stay in tune is by signing up for the IPMM newsletter.

duckling

good-night-nurse

irregular-plural

mad-elga-two

my-heavens

nine-days-later

teahouse-to-the-river

the-soapstone-factory-4

Written by:
Kimmy_gonzales
Jul 20, 2015

tags: abstract, art, exit art, found art, free, gallery, jane hammond, john ashbery, mixed media, new york, nyc, poets, portfolio, raphael rubinstein, surreal