Art Design Featured Illustration San Francisco

Nik Schulz’s Detailed Approach to Minimalist Design

Written by:
Kimmy_gonzales
Aug 24, 2015

L-Dopa’s minimalist design work is both detailed yet simple, and that approach makes him an instant classic. There are many illustrators who incorporate the likes of car designs, business charts, company logos, and architectural designs into their portfolios, but Nik Schulz puts his instantly identifiable spin on everything from schematics to mad-libs, creating a unique style.

Schulz opened up his studio L-Dopa Design + Illustration in 1999. Since then, he has been an illustrator, working with magazines such as Wired Magazine, Fortune, Time, and ESPN. Schulz’s finely detailed approach to his work is ubiquitous and unmistakable.

With a mixture of contemporary fashion and advertising print style incorporated into the playful images that children see on boxes of cereal, the nostalgic images call back to toy airplanes and make-believe from a bygone era.

Recently, Schulz has released a series of prints depicting vintage cars. He states, “I like to distill their forms down to the purest state, to create these almost ideal images.” While most print artists get down to the nitty gritty, giving their audience a heap of detailed and intricate prints, Schulz issues his audience a series of designs that he’s made to look seamless. His approach to refining such a pure image showcases an appreciation for aesthetics that he has developed over the years, which gives his work such a unique flavor.

L-Dopa lives and works in Sonoma County. If you want to explore more of his work, you can check it out on his website, and if you’re always on the look out for new art, the best way to stay in tune is by signing up for the IPMM newsletter.

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Written by:
Kimmy_gonzales
Aug 24, 2015

tags: art, design, designs and illustrations, detailed, ESPN, fortune, l-dopa, l-dopa designs, Minimalist, nik schulz, print, print art, sonoma county, time, toy airplanes, vintage cars, wired magazine