Art Featured

The Surreal World of Bryce Wymer

Written by:
Brandon_howard
Feb 03, 2015

Meet Bryce Wymer, an innovative animator, director and visual artist based in Brooklyn, New York. According to his blog, Wymer’s “personal works address human social progression and the driving relation between the powerful and the powerless,” and his works show it.

The painting above, Casorati’s Surgeons is in line with many of Wymer’s colorful, often jarring images of power and/or technology imposing itself on the human form. This painting was made after surgery to the artist’s hand, lending an autobiographical element of vulnerability to his work. Another striking aspect of the painting is the way the inside of the hand resembles computer hardware and cables, morphing the hand from a symbol of humanity into a piece of cold equipment with which to tinker.

Another striking piece of Wymer’s visual work which speaks to his recurring theme of society’s progression toward powerless bodies is Ode to Emmett Bobo Till. The body, in this case, is the victim not of physiological vulnerability but the victim of racism and violence. The subject, Emmett Till, was a Chicago-born African American who was assaulted – his assailants gouged out one of his eyes and shot him in the head before dumping his weighted body in the Tallahatchie River. The year was 1955 and the crime was speaking with a white woman. The surreal, haunting image painted by Wymer is an ode to the recurring travesty of racism; an incredibly moving piece of art, especially today in the wake of Ferguson and the debate over institutionalized racism.

Ode To Emmett Bobo Till

Moving into motion direction, Bryce Wymer wears many hats, working in post-production, 2D animation and directing. One of his most compelling works, Wrights of Spring 20120, is a short film that ambitiously attempts to capture a notion of opulence throughout history, beginning in 10,000 BC with the agricultural revolution and working its way through Versailles and the roaring 20s, culminating in the 2000s, an era of “superficiality.” The film is loaded with colorful images representing the collection of commodity, and how our bodies wear these items like jewelry, cigarettes and shoes.

Check out more of Bryce Wymer’s striking artwork on his website and on his blog. If you think art makes life better, you can sign up for our newsletter here.

 

 

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Written by:
Brandon_howard
Feb 03, 2015

tags: art, art criticism, bryce wymer, featured, film, short film, visual art