Artist Feature: Guerrilla Girls Artist Feature: Guerrilla Girls
Frida Kahlo

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Artist Feature: Guerrilla Girls

Artist Feature: Guerrilla Girls

Written by:
Wendy Bonham-Carter
Mar 15, 2024

The Guerrilla Girls are an art collective of unnamed individuals whose political art challenges the art world at large, calling out racism, sexism, and corruption. Their posters, billboards, collages, and performances use a combination of graphic design and writing to expose injustices and inequalities within art institutions. Through decades of vocal activism, the Guerrilla Girls have made intersectional dialogue a must for art institutions that want to remain relevant. They’ve helped to set standards for inclusivity and diversity within art collections and exhibitions across the country, and have forced galleries far and wide to change their collection practices.

The anonymous women who make up the Guerrilla Girls wear life-like gorilla masks during public appearances and refuse to be identified. When they give statements or interviews they go by pseudonyms of dead female artists through the ages. The anonymity of the group is meant to keep the conversation firmly on their work and activism, rather than their biographies. It also creates the sense that there is a vigilante army of art world justice coming to hold bad actors accountable. Since their identities are unknown, they can’t be punished for their actions, and have more power over the powerful people marginalizing women and people of color.

Buy The Not Just Dead White Guys Coloring Book featuring Guerrilla Girls!

Guerrilla Girls

Guerrilla Girls | Art by Kat Sampson

Guerrilla Girls
B. Unknown

“You’re seeing less than half the picture without the vision of women artists and artists of color.”

Most of the posters and graphics by the Guerrilla Girls include statistics and are fact-based. They pair these facts with humorous images and tongue-in-cheek observations. (“Do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum?”) Informative, memorable, and darkly funny, these images are meant to stick with anyone who sees them and spark conversations around the gallery, museum or other institution that the Guerrilla Girls are calling out. 

Buy The Not Just Dead White Guys Coloring Book featuring Guerrilla Girls!

artist

In collaboration with Kat Sampson, we present The Not Just Dead White Guys coloring book with 24 vibrant portraits, showcasing diverse artists, both deceased and living. Half are contemporary artists, including Guerrilla Girls who are shaping the art scene today, while the others are important historical figures. Join us to celebrate their diverse contributions and create a more inclusive art world!

 

 

Written by:
Wendy Bonham-Carter
Mar 15, 2024